Health care worry is associated with worse outcomes in multiple sclerosis.

TitleHealth care worry is associated with worse outcomes in multiple sclerosis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsJones SM, Amtmann D
JournalRehabil Psychol
Volume59
Issue3
Pagination354-9
Date Published2014 Aug
ISSN1939-1544
Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: People with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience higher levels of depression and anxiety than the general population. This is the first study to examine the relationship of worry about affording health care and symptoms in MS.

RESEARCH METHOD/DESIGN: People with MS (n = 405) were recruited for a needs assessment study. Participants completed a structured telephone interview measuring depression, anxiety, fatigue, sleep disturbance, pain interference, social function, and perceived cognitive functioning, and rated their worry about the following: premiums increasing, income decreasing, affording health care services, insurance dropping coverage, and affording prescriptions. Multiple regression analyses controlled for age, gender, disability status, education, income, and health insurance coverage.

RESULTS: The highest rated worry was inability to afford health care services. Higher health care worry was reported by women, younger participants, participants with lower incomes, and those with only private (vs. public) insurance. Total level of health care worry was significantly related to depression, anxiety, fatigue, sleep disturbance, pain interference, social function, and perceived cognitive functioning.

CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Health care worry was significantly related to psychological, physical, and cognitive symptoms. Future research should compare health care worry in MS with other populations (i.e., healthy adults) and should examine changes in health care worry over time.

DOI10.1037/a0037074
Alternate JournalRehabil Psychol
PubMed ID25019308